here is where i will share with you my favorite weapons and armors and show you where to get them and how much and why they are so fucking cool

 

Welsh Dragon Forge Athame
Overall Length: 9.5”  Blade Length: 4” Grip Length: 5.5” 
Wrought iron blade and handle forged from a single bar.
$15.00 (sold)
via
welshdragonforge.com
I figured with this one i might deviate from my own beaten path. This is no weapon this is what one calls an athame, a ritual knife used in celtic and wiccan rituals as well as other various pagan rituals across a spectrum of various beliefs. typically it is only just hardly sharpened enough to cut sprigs and other small plant material, this one in particular is my own and i have not gotten around to sharpening it at all yet. 
the design on this is very simple for an athame as many that are used in practice are much more decorated. however for my own practice i prefer hand forged iron and simplicity. the twisted handle is actual far more comfortable in the hand than one might imagine and the piece has a good weight to it.

Welsh Dragon Forge Athame

Overall Length: 9.5”  Blade Length: 4” Grip Length: 5.5” 

Wrought iron blade and handle forged from a single bar.

$15.00 (sold)

via

welshdragonforge.com

I figured with this one i might deviate from my own beaten path. This is no weapon this is what one calls an athame, a ritual knife used in celtic and wiccan rituals as well as other various pagan rituals across a spectrum of various beliefs. typically it is only just hardly sharpened enough to cut sprigs and other small plant material, this one in particular is my own and i have not gotten around to sharpening it at all yet. 

the design on this is very simple for an athame as many that are used in practice are much more decorated. however for my own practice i prefer hand forged iron and simplicity. the twisted handle is actual far more comfortable in the hand than one might imagine and the piece has a good weight to it.

Anonymous asked
Do you happen to know where I can buy some throwing knives?

Absofuckinglutely

throwing knives are pretty straight forward. if it has a good balance and are weighty enough than they should be fine. however if they are made of stainless steel be warned, they WILL chip easily and require frequent resharpening.

for basic stainless throwers you can go to just about any local army surplus store in your area but lacking that any online knife or sword shop that sells various knives and swords typically will carry them.

Trueswords.com

and 

medievalcollectibles.com

are two that i would recommend for online ordering as i havent gotten a bad deal from either. medieval collectibles however has the better selection.

also rule 2 with throwers is the same as anything else. keep it simple stupid. dont get anything that deviates too far from standard design or you’re just paying for cheap bullshit.

for example

^perfectly acceptable…

^fell off a donkey shit wagon

Blade Butler is back!

Heads up everyone blade butler will be resuming regular posts tomorrow! After today where i will be editting posts to make corrections i will resuming pacing at 1-3 posts a day.

Asks and suggestions relating to ancient to colonial melee weaponry, armor, and combat culture are still welcome as always

art-of-swords:

How to care for Damascus Steel

The term “Damascus steel” can refer to two different types of ferrous (containing iron) materials characterized by the watery pattern produced from the controlled mixture and physical manipulation of the iron and steel. Western Europeans were first introduced to this material around the 3rd-4th centuries from the historical trading center of Damascus, in present-day Syria.

While there are examples of this material being produced in Damascus itself, its technical and physical origins are from India and the Middle East. Damascus steel is not to be confused with damascene, which is a process of inlaying gold leaf onto the surface of steel for the purpose of decoration. Cast Damascus steel, known as wootz, was popular in the East.

Today, metal workers still make swords from Damascus steel, and jewellery designers fashion it into rings or bracelets. Regardless of what the item is, the process of caring for Damascus steel is relatively simple. Routine maintenance—including polishing—will ensure the long life of your Damascus steel item. Before polishing the steel, thoroughly clean the item to remove any dust or debris.

So how do you care for your Damascus steel blades? Can the Damascus be hand polished to remove light scratching? And would the definition of the pattern be lost? Here’s how you do it…

Things you’ll need:

  • Polishing cloth
  • Oil for blades
  • Sharpening stone
  • Soft towel

How to do it

  1. Polish Damascus steel regularly with a polishing cloth. If the Damascus steel is in the form of a ring, do this done once a week. If the Damascus steel is on a decorative blade, you should polish it once every three months or more often if you use it often.
  2. Sharpen blades if they become dull. Use a good sharpening stone and oil for the best results, and polish the blade after sharpening with a soft towel. Do not use a polishing cloth to polish the blade when oil is on it.
  3. Wipe off all Damascus steel blades promptly after using them. This is important to keep the blade from getting rusty.
  4. Oil a Damascus steel blade once a year for decorative swords and knives. You do not need to sharpen it beforehand, but doing so will give the blade a rich luster.
  5. Polish Damascus steel rings with a bit of whitening toothpaste and a scouring pad, such as a Scotch Pad, for a matte finish, or just use the scouring pad for a semi-polished finish.
  6. Dry Damascus steel promptly after it gets wet. Do not leave excess water on the steel because, just like with any other metal, excessive water or moisture exposure can lead to rust.

How to Polish Damascus Steel

Things you’ll need:

  • Warm water
  • Mild dishwashing liquid
  • Container
  • Leather gloves

Cleaning the Damascus Steel

  1. Combine warm water and a few drops of mild dishwashing liquid in a container.
  2. For safety purposes, equip yourself with a pair of leather gloves if cleaning a sword or knife. The leather gloves will prevent you from accidentally cutting your hands during the cleaning process.
  3. Saturate the corner of a sponge with the water and dishwashing liquid mixture.
  4. Scrub the steel with the sponge from top to bottom on both sides.
  5. Wet a clean sponge with warm water. Rinse the steel with the sponge to wipe away the water/dishwashing liquid.
  6. Dry the steel with a soft towel. Do not let the steel air dry. Doing so may lead to rust.

Polishing the Damascus Steel

  1. Wipe the Damascus steel from top to bottom with a polishing cloth. For blades, polish once every few months.
  2. Use a small amount of whitening toothpaste and a scouring pad to polish Damascus steel rings.
  3. Polish the blade with soft cloth after you sharpen Damascus steel swords and knife.

How to Sharpen Damascus Steel Blades

As a general tip for sharpening Damascus Steel blades you might want to pull the blade across the sharpening rod slowly. Speed does not help sharpen a Damascus knife, and it increases the risk of injury if your hand slips with the knife held in it.

Things you’ll need:

  • Straight ceramic sharpening rod
  • Triangle cross-section ceramic sharpening rod

Sharpening smooth blades

  1. Hold the ceramic sharpening rod in your left hand.
  2. Place the part of the blade nearest the handle on the rod at a 20-degree angle. This called the “heel” of the blade.
  3. Pull the blade slowly from heel to tip across the sharpening rod. Use light pressure so you do not remove any of the metal from the blade.
  4. Turn the knife over and pull the blade against the rod again to sharpen the other side. Next, repeat the process once more on each side.

Sharpening serrated blades

  1. Hold the knife blade vertically and draw it from heel to tip down a triangle cross-section set of ceramic rods.
  2. Alternate sides of the knife as you work to sharpen the serrated edge. You do not need to sharpen each individual serration.
  3. Repeat two to three times on each side of the blade.

Sources:

Tinker pierce IDKE Fantasy Fighter
Overall Length: 13 3/4” Blade Length: 8 3/4” Grip Length: 5”
5160 Carbon spring steel hand forged blade, brass bolster and mesquite wood handle carved from a single piece. Appleseed edging.
$275.00 (sold)
via
Tinkerswords.com
Another unique piece from tinker pierce, as told by the master himself IDKE stands for I dont know either. Basically he made this on a whim and an idea and created a beautifully elegant blade that flows like water. There isnt much to say about this blade…really just look at it. look at it and just allow yourself a moment to drool over it a little.

Tinker pierce IDKE Fantasy Fighter

Overall Length: 13 3/4” Blade Length: 8 3/4” Grip Length: 5”

5160 Carbon spring steel hand forged blade, brass bolster and mesquite wood handle carved from a single piece. Appleseed edging.

$275.00 (sold)

via

Tinkerswords.com


Another unique piece from tinker pierce, as told by the master himself IDKE stands for I dont know either. Basically he made this on a whim and an idea and created a beautifully elegant blade that flows like water. There isnt much to say about this blade…really just look at it. look at it and just allow yourself a moment to drool over it a little.

Greetings to all new followers! do please feel free to send asks for anything at all in regards to what you would like to learn or have me help find and i will do a personal spotlight or if not i’ll help whatever else way i can! So my sword butts feel free to approach me for whatever you desire! 

Kit Rae Black Jet Throwing Knives
Overall Length: 8 1/2” Blade Length: 4 1/2”
440 heat treated and tempered stainless steel construction with 1 1/2” nylon wrap and fuller. comes with leather thrower sheath.
29.95
via
KultofAthena.com
Kit Rae is one of my favorite companies when it comes to newer model weapons with a sleek edgy look. All of there products are functional and these in particular are very sharp looking (no pun intended) There isnt really much to a standard throwing knife other than balance and when buying online you really do take a chance that the manufacturer didnt just ship out something that looked cool and hope people would buy. however I have faith in Kit Rae and from the look of the handle and blade ratio I think we can trust these. In addition the sheath is very nice so for 29.95 you really get a steal here.

Kit Rae Black Jet Throwing Knives


Overall Length:
8 1/2” Blade Length: 4 1/2”

440 heat treated and tempered stainless steel construction with 1 1/2” nylon wrap and fuller. comes with leather thrower sheath.

29.95

via

KultofAthena.com

Kit Rae is one of my favorite companies when it comes to newer model weapons with a sleek edgy look. All of there products are functional and these in particular are very sharp looking (no pun intended) There isnt really much to a standard throwing knife other than balance and when buying online you really do take a chance that the manufacturer didnt just ship out something that looked cool and hope people would buy. however I have faith in Kit Rae and from the look of the handle and blade ratio I think we can trust these. In addition the sheath is very nice so for 29.95 you really get a steal here.

Anonymous asked
yo more throwing knives

as you wish! forgive me if i cant finish a spotlight before my break is over. 

Remember my little sword butts if there is any particular culture that you think needs more weapon spotlights or a specific era or type of weapon do let me know! I run this blog for my followers and I want to know what you would like to see. No need to be specific just give me a general idea of the area of knowledge you are interested in and I’ll cater to you as best I can.

Cheness Cutlery O-Katana
Overall Length: 47” Blade Length: 33” Tsuka (Handle) Length: 12”
Blade forged with 9020 Carbon Spring Steel Full tang and bo-hi groove. Hamon is simulated yet distinctive (though difficult to see in this picture) Genuine ray skin wrap and cotton ito wrap. Ito comes in brown and blue. Steel tsuba, and oil tempered blade.
299.99
via
Chenessinc.com
The O-Katana is a 3 - 6 in linger variation in the atandard katana. This one in particular has received much praise through out the community for not only its incredible craftsmanship and design but also its relatively affordable price.

Cheness cutlery crafts weapons with a focus on the japanese martial art of Iaito  and as such they keep in mind that it is an expensive sport to get into. With this knowledge in hand they keep their prices at a 300 dollar maximum which, for the quality of their products, is insane. The quality of steel used to forge their blades is legendary in the modern sword making industry. Cheness cutlery’s 9020 carbon steel has been proven to hold up to even the most vicious torture. The iwner if sword buyers guide.com  tested it himself on a steel drum. These were the results
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IVJZkWDk_KA
Needless to say the results are beyond stunning. The quality and durability of the blade for a monosteel sword is of a caliber ive not seen in swords of any japanese style. Normally the thinness of the blade and length, especially with an O-katana, is worrisome to the wielder when it comes to durability. That issue is completely out the window with this weapon.
In addition to unmatched durability this sword is quite a looker. The extra length is not only an additive to the singing cutting ability of the weapon, but also gives a wonderful aesthetic in person that is difficult to convey over pictures. The tsuba is a traditional, and beautiful, crane design that, in my opinion,  tops off the basic traditional look of the blade.
Overall a tremendous bang for your buck, expect to see more cheness cutlery in the future.
(Credit to tumblr user that-grey-hoodie for the spotlight request)

Cheness Cutlery O-Katana


Overall Length:
47” Blade Length: 33” Tsuka (Handle) Length: 12”

Blade forged with 9020 Carbon Spring Steel Full tang and bo-hi groove. Hamon is simulated yet distinctive (though difficult to see in this picture) Genuine ray skin wrap and cotton ito wrap. Ito comes in brown and blue. Steel tsuba, and oil tempered blade.

299.99

via

Chenessinc.com


The O-Katana is a 3 - 6 in linger variation in the atandard katana. This one in particular has received much praise through out the community for not only its incredible craftsmanship and design but also its relatively affordable price.

Cheness cutlery crafts weapons with a focus on the japanese martial art of Iaito and as such they keep in mind that it is an expensive sport to get into. With this knowledge in hand they keep their prices at a 300 dollar maximum which, for the quality of their products, is insane. The quality of steel used to forge their blades is legendary in the modern sword making industry. Cheness cutlery’s 9020 carbon steel has been proven to hold up to even the most vicious torture. The iwner if sword buyers guide.com tested it himself on a steel drum. These were the results

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IVJZkWDk_KA

Needless to say the results are beyond stunning. The quality and durability of the blade for a monosteel sword is of a caliber ive not seen in swords of any japanese style. Normally the thinness of the blade and length, especially with an O-katana, is worrisome to the wielder when it comes to durability. That issue is completely out the window with this weapon.

In addition to unmatched durability this sword is quite a looker. The extra length is not only an additive to the singing cutting ability of the weapon, but also gives a wonderful aesthetic in person that is difficult to convey over pictures. The tsuba is a traditional, and beautiful, crane design that, in my opinion, tops off the basic traditional look of the blade.

Overall a tremendous bang for your buck, expect to see more cheness cutlery in the future.

(Credit to tumblr user that-grey-hoodie for the spotlight request)